Press

What is a 'Cultural Experience' in Minnesota?

“As survey participants describe their motivation for cultural engagement, the top reason is ‘having fun.’ They also are seeking exposure to ideas and personal development. The desire for self-improvement through cultural activities ‘is consistent across.’ Further, a whopping 76 percent of respondents say they engage in cultural events for stress relief.

“Kristin Prestegaard, Mia’s chief engagement officer, says in the previous Culture Track survey, stress relief was something that showed up for millennial audiences on what they’re seeking from cultural experiences. ‘Now, we see that the whole world is stressed out,’ she says. ‘It’s across all the age groups. People want a ‘shoulder-drop moment’; it’s a time when you can just be present where you are.'” Read more.

Twin Cities Business | January 31, 2018

Why this Indianapolis museum wants you to go down to the woods today

“Maggie Hartnick, the managing director of LaPlaca Cohen, stresses that institutions should interpret Culture Track’s data in ways that are relevant to their individual context. ‘It’s important for everyone to understand that for audiences, for better or worse, entertainment is really number one,’ Hartnick says. ‘That doesn’t have to mean that they aren’t shown challenging content.’

“’Excellence and visitation are not necessarily divorced,’ says Julián Zugazagoitia, the director and chief executive of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, another encyclopedic museum with similar demographics to Indianapolis. Annual attendance has risen by 200,000 since he took the helm in 2010, which Zugazagoitia attributes to the overall quality and scholarship of the exhibitions programme as well as an effort to widen access.” Read more.

The Art Newspaper | January 2018

 

State of the Culture, Part I: Museums, ‘Experiences,’ and the Year of Big Fun Art

“Here’s how that Culture Track study summed up the trends facing museums this year: ‘For today’s audiences, the definition of culture has democratized, nearly to the point of extinction. It’s no longer about high versus low or culture versus entertainment; it’s about relevance or irrelevance. Activities that have traditionally been considered culture and those that haven’t are now on a level playing field.’

“Such cultural flattening echoes the effects of capitalist globalization and information technology on labor markets, where the ‘disruption’ of old ways is pushed as a dogma and local borders no longer defend workers from competition from half a world away.” Read more.

Artnet | December 27, 2017

'Culture Track '17' Finds American Definition of Culture Changing

“It was bound to happen in the pop culture capitol of the world; a vanishing distinction between high- and lowbrow art. In their new Culture Track ’17 study, New York City marketing and design firm LaPlaca Cohen found that the difference between opry and opera has become blurred among American audiences. With so many TV shows and movie options available to the average consumer, theater, opera, dance and the philharmonic have become choices on a menu that might include Star Wars: The Last Jedi or the latest episode of Game of Thrones.” Read more.

The Hollywood Reporter | December 12, 2017

Diversity, making culture “fun” among challenges of Denver arts scene revealed by new survey

“The study noted major shifts in loyalty to arts and culture brands, as well as the way audiences support cultural institutions, in light of the ‘easy, informal’ examples set by crowdfunding sites such as Kickstarter. ‘What we’ve found is the definition (of culture) has expanded almost to the point of extinction,’ Hartnick said, adding that a street fair or themed dinner falls under that definition these days.” Read more.

The Denver Post | November 14, 2017

Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirrors reignites art's selfie debate

“A recent study by the marketing firm LaPlaca Cohen may stoke the cultural elite’s fears of the fall of western civilization as we know it. According to the research, ‘the definition of culture has democratized’, with participants placing socializing and interactivity as top priorities in cultural activities – putting Caravaggio on the same pedestal as Coachella.” Read more.

The Guardian | November 9, 2017

How Do We Define Culture? A Study Tries to Find Out

“If you’re reading Hyperallergic, you’re already well aware of the importance of culture to society, but what exactly is culture? How do we define it now? And is that definition different from what people would have thought as little as 10 years ago? These are some of the key questions for Culture Track — a survey of Americans’ views and habits in the realm of cultural activities — which made public its 2017 findings in October.” Read more.

Hyperallergic | November 9, 2017

HOW DO WE DEFINE CULTURE?

“Last week I attended the New York reveal of LaPlaca Cohen’s triennial Culture Track survey. Beginning in 2001, Culture Track has been surveying cultural audiences to determine attitudes and behaviors and makes for some really interesting reading. Since its inception, Culture Track has grown in scope and scale, but always has at its core the initial survey in order to track changing attitudes over time. I have to say, the 2017 results were pretty fantastic.” Read more.

Sarah Devine | November 3, 2017

NOTICE: The Response I Give May Only Reflect My Current Preferences

“Perhaps the takeaway is, people are more nuanced than the feedback they are giving you at the moment. Whether it is an audience survey, a comment made on social media, or to the box office a statement should be view as ‘this is how I feel right now, but in other times and situations, my preferences may contradict what I just said.'” Read more.

Butts in Seats | October 18, 2017

Survey: Massive Paradigm Shift Underway In American Culture

“A new study shows that Americans are more loyal to restaurants and retail stores than to cultural organizations, such as museums and theaters. The Culture Track study by marketing agency LaPlaca Cohen also reveals that Americans are changing the way they define culture, and social media has a lot to do with those changes.” Read more.

WSHU Public Radio | October 18, 2017

Is the Museum of Ice Cream the Future of Culture?

“The year is 2027. Your cousins are in town. You want to take them on an entertaining cultural excursion. So you pile into your self-driving car and head out, not to your local art museum—that would be so 2016—but to the Museum of Ice Cream, a grownup theme park custom-made for Instagram.

“Is this the future of American culture? A new study suggests that it might be. Audiences are more likely to view a visit to a street fair as a cultural experience than a trip to the opera or the ballet, according to Culture Track 2017, a report by marketing firm LaPlaca Cohen and research firm Kelton Global. The study’s authors say that the definition of culture—long an avenue of self-cultivation that was synonymous with refinement—has democratized so much that the word may soon hold little significance at all.” Read more.

Artnet | October 18th, 2017

Museums have a Problem with Fun (Data)

“Museums need visitors. Anyone who flips through an annual report or glances on a website can attest to that fact. But, how do you get them there?

“You entice them, of course. But, how do you do that? I can share how I did that. When I used to run programs, I would try to show ‘fun’ through the publicity photos and in the description of the activities. But, saying something was fun always seemed a signal that the experience was anything but. If you need to say is fun, it probably really isn’t.” Read more.

Brilliant Idea Studio | October 17, 2017

Attitudes Toward Arts Groups Shift, With Implications for Fundraising, Report Says

“The definition of a cultural organization has shifted, revealing potential implications for fundraising by arts and cultural nonprofits, according to a study that looked at the changing behaviors of audiences and donors. For example, more than one-third of those who visited an art museum did not consider the experience cultural, and more than 50 percent of theatergoers had the same response, according to the report. Respondents were more likely to regard a street fair or dining experience as a cultural event, as opposed to a performance of opera or ballet.” Read more.

The Chronicle of Philanthropy | October 17, 2017

37% of Art Museum Visitors Don’t View Them as Culture—and Other Takeaways from the 2017 Culture Track Report

“What do you picture when you think of a ‘cultural experience’? The white walls of a museum? The high ceilings of an opera house? The flashing lights of Broadway musical marquees?

“In reality, the image Americans have of a cultural experience is dramatically more diverse, according to the 2017 Culture Track report—the seventh iteration of the national tracking survey of cultural audiences, due to be released tomorrow. For many respondents, going to the park or eating at a food truck counts as a cultural experience, while attending a museum does not.” Read more.

Artsy | October 16, 2017